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When is an electricity measurement compliant with calibration law?

Not least due to the new Energy Collection Act, electricity metering in compliance with calibration law has become increasingly relevant. In the last few weeks, we have been receiving more and more customer inquiries about so-called calibration-compliant electricity metering. This type of measurement is required by the authorities in certain constellations, which are characterized by a special obligation to provide proof and accountability. For example, it is required for the measurement of electricity quantities that are subject to levy privileges and are passed on to third parties. But when is a measuring device compliant with calibration law?

A general answer to this question, which is valid for all federal states, is difficult to formulate here. The right contact persons are the responsible measuring and calibration authorities of the federal states. This is also made clear by BAFA in its information sheet on electricity meters, and it also points out that measurement of electrical energy that does not comply with calibration law is to be classified as an administrative offense and is punishable by heavy fines imposed by the competent measurement and calibration authorities.

 

Measuring device conforming to calibration law

Nevertheless, it can be stated that a measurement conforming to calibration law always consists of a conformity-assessed plug-on converter and an MID electricity meter. MID is an abbreviation for the English term "Measuring Instruments Directive". This refers to the "Directive 2004/22/EC of the European Parliament and of the Council of 31 March 2004 on measuring instruments". If one of the two components is not conformity assessed according to MID, then the measuring point cannot be in conformity with calibration law either. Only in special exceptional cases an exemption of the measurement conforming to the calibration law is possible. However, the possibility of this exemption must be clarified with the responsible verification authority in each individual case. As a rule, a conformity assessment for current transformers does not expire. In the case of electricity meters, it must be renewed after eight years. Current transformers are exclusively plug-on transformers which, in contrast to the widespread folding transformers, have to be installed with increased effort.

A current measurement that complies with calibration regulations always consists of a conformity-assessed current transformer and an MID electricity meter.
A current measurement that complies with calibration regulations always consists of a conformity-assessed current transformer and an MID electricity meter.

Differential measurement

In certain situations, a so-called differential measurement appears to be useful. A differential measurement is the determination of a quantity of electricity that is determined by subtracting several other quantities of electricity. There is currently no clarity as to whether this procedure leads to a measurement that conforms to calibration law, and in any case the responsible measurement and calibration authorities should be consulted. Here you can find an overview of the competent authorities in the federal states: https://www.eichamt.de/.


Summary

The following can therefore be stated with regard to the question posed at the outset:

  •  A measuring point that conforms to calibration law always consists of a conformity-assessed plug-on transformer and an electricity meter that has been conformity-assessed according to MID.
  • In any case, you should inform yourself at the measuring and calibration authority responsible for you, which requirements are placed by them on a current measurement conforming to calibration law.


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